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Startup Tech Events Europe Feb 2019

Startup System EU  offers this European Innovation Conference calendar as a resource to help make connections between startups, investors and innovators.

Our goal is to bring together startups and innovation professionals to learn about cutting-edge innovations and foster dynamic conversation addressing how technology is transforming Europe.

JAN-MAR | APR-JUN | JUL-SEP | OCT-DEC

European Innovation Calendar | European Accelerator Deadlines | European Digital Health Conferences

Feel free to email updates, corrections or add conference dates.

  • ISPO Munich 2019 – The largest trade fair for sports business more than 2,800 exhibitors will be presenting their latest sports products from segments such as Snowsports, Outdoor, Health & Fitness, Urban and Teamsports at the Messe München exhibition grounds. Look forward to four days full of impulses and rich contacts. Munich, Germany; Feb 3-6, 2019
  • HRD Summit – the most senior gathering of HR Directors on the globe. The 2019 Summit will welcome over 1,000 attendees, over 150 speakers across 8 content streams, over 80 Exhibitors, over 250 Match Meetings and 11+ hours of networking spread across 2 days. Birmingham, UK; Feb 5, 2019
  • ICE Totally Gaming 2019 – ICE London is the only B2B gaming event that truly brings together the international online and offline gaming sectors. London, UK; Feb 5-7, 2019
  • London Affiliate Conference 2019 –  the world’s largest dedicated iGaming affiliate exhibition and conference, London, UK; Feb 6-9, 2019
  • Digital Relaunch Konferenz – Experten-Wissen für eine erfolgreiche Digitalisierung. Bei der Digital:Relaunch dreht sich alles um praxisorientierte Lösungen und Best Cases rund um die Digitale Transformation von Leadership, Arbeitsplatz, Business und Marketing. Tauschen Sie sich mit Experten und anderen Besuchern aus und genießen Sie die After-Show-Party. Berlin, Germany; Feb 11-12, 2019
  • Tech Invest Berlin – Meet leading and influential European investors in a high-end like environment and pitch on stage: following the format that has made the success of startups pitches: only 4 minutes per pitch, and 15 minutes per keynotes, one to one meetings, networking sessions, awards ceremony. Berlin, Germany; Feb 12, 2019
  • MOVE: Mobility Re-imagined – The world’s most important mobility event, where disruptive technology and innovation drive the future of urban transport. MOVE will bring together disruptors, their technology and their attitude with stakeholders across all modes and disciplines: to dialogue, to create insight and to promote collaboration. We guarantee to be more expansive and multi-disciplined than any other event on the planet. #MOVE2019 London, UK; Feb 12-13, 2019
  • France Tech Transfer Invest 2019 – Tech Tour together with SATT (France’s tech transfer acceleration offices), BPI and EuroQuity are pleased to announce the third edition of  France Tech Transfer Invest (FTTI), an event that aims to stimulate investment into French tech transfer spin-offs. Paris, France; Feb 13-14, 2019
  • Learning Technologies UK 2019 – Europe’s leading showcase of organizational learning and the technology used to support learning at work. With more than 8,500 visitors, 150 free L&D seminars, over 200 exhibitors, an exhibition hall packed with the latest learning technologies, innovation and best practice and the industry’s leading L&D conference, it provides a unique and exciting environment for all those involved in workplace learning. London, UK; Feb 13-14, 2019
  • World Congress of Angel Investors WBAF 2019 – An affiliated partner of the G20 Global Partnership of Financial Inclusion (GPFI), the World Business Angels Investment Forum (WBAF) promotes angel investment as an innovative financial inclusion tool at the global level. At the G20 meetings in Riyadh, it was announced that WBAF 2019 is now an affiliated congress of the G20 Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion (GPFI). Istanbul, Turkey; Feb 17-19, 2019
  • WeTech Berlin 2019 – The conference will include a series of unique encounters and discussions on topics focusing on innovation & tech, business ties between Germany and Israel, investment opportunities and more. During the conference, we shall examine how tech and innovation manifest in an array of fields, from cyber and industrial manufacturing to finance and automotive. Berlin, Germany; Feb 18-19, 2019
  • SingularityU Spain Summit 2019 – We empower a global community with the mindset, skillset, and network. For the first time in Madrid, the cutting-edge SingularityU Spain Summit brings you the future of the world, the Silicon Valley state of the art technologies and next to come. Fasten your belts!!! Madrid, Spain; Feb 20-21, 2019
  • The User Experience Design Conference – bringing designers, developers, business stakeholders, researchers, and marketing specialists together. The theme of the conference is designers and marketing, helping businesses grow. We’ve invited amazing speakers from Conde Nast, Booking.com, Monzo, Canonical, Ocado, ThomasCook, Which?, Virgin Atlantic and others. London, UK; Feb 21, 2019
  • Startup World Cup Baltic Series – Startup World Cup is a series of startup conferences and competitions in 13 countries, hunting for the next emerging unicorn to award US $1,000,000. Riga, Lativa; Feb 21-22, 2019
  • TechChill – Having grown from a small grassroots movement of like-minded tech enthusiasts, TechChill celebrates the best of the Baltic startup community by annually bringing together 2000+ attendees, including the fastest growing startups, most innovative corporations, investors active in the region and talented tech enthusiasts. TechChill is organized by a non-profit foundation of the same name, empowering the Baltic startup ecosystem throughout the year. This year is no exception – the two-day agenda at TechChill 2019 will feature 70+ speakers and 20+ side events, as well as some legendary afterparties. Riga, Lativa; Feb 21-22, 2019
  • Xside – a creative hub of excellence that celebrates the ideas, skills, and people that are leading future change. A groundbreaking gathering where converging communities unite. Barcelona, Spain; Feb 24-27, 2020
  • 4YFN 2019 – Over three days, 4YFN will showcase the latest tech startup innovations from around the world. Featuring curated content, startup pitches, competitions, and dedicated networking sessions. The event is tailor-made to connect the international startup community, investors, talent and corporations. Barcelona, Spain; Feb 25-27, 2019
  • Mobile World Congress Barcelona 2019 – The GSMA Mobile World Congress is the world’s largest exhibition for the mobile industry, incorporating a thought-leadership conference. Barcelona, Spain; Feb 25-28, 2019
  • SuperReturn International – The world’s largest private equity and venture capital event. 2,500+ attendees. 700+ LPs. 1,100+ GPs. 400+ speakers. Unlimited possibilities. Private equity and venture capital conference determining strategies for successful fundraising, value creation, exits and maximizing returns in a new decade of private equity. Berlin, Germany; Feb 26 – Mar 1, 2019
  • LONDON TECH JOB FAIR SPRING 2019 – a chance for job seekers to talk to companies that are hiring in person. If you’ve had enough of submitting your CV online without the opportunity to make a lasting first impression, here’s your chance to change your strategy and do a bit of networking. London, UK; Feb 27, 2019

Startup Tech Events Europe Feb 2019

Startup Business Review

Startup Business Review – helps businesses to increase sales and find new investment. Using the Business Ecosystem Plan (BEP) methodology we can help you clearly define your stakeholder value propositions, business models and go to market strategies. The entire process can be achieved in as little as 9 weeks for a fixed price – and comes with 100% money back guarantee. Whether you are talking to customer, teams, or investors – the SER Team will help you with crystal clear communication.


Recently, we sat down with our good friend and SER Team Troy Norcross to discuss fund raising, Brexit and the European Startup Ecosystem.

How will Brexit impact the European Startup Scene (since London is such a big startup community)?

Brexit was a pretty big shock to the London startup scene. The initial feeling was that it would impact access to both talent and funding. As we are just now beginning the negotiations, there has not been a noticeable effect.So long as London is a financial center and a center for media, FinTech and AdTech start-ups will remain because of the access to customers. In my view, the big opportunity is for EU cities like Berlin to capitalize on the shift. Overall, I believe the European Startup Scene will benefit because there will be more capital and resources available to promising EU startups once the UK leaves the EU.

What’s the biggest challenge that European Startup Founders face?

A systemic aversion to risk. Investors don’t like risk. Customers don’t like risk. Potential employees don’t like risk. In order to succeed, startup founders must find the right way to either de-risk their business or to demonstrate their ability to mitigate risk. Investors want to see revenue and traction and a working business model. Customers want to see proven platforms and solutions that others have already proven that they work. Teams want to have confidence that the company won’t just go broke and lay everyone off tomorrow. As a founder, your biggest challenge is the fact that everyone is afraid of risk – and by default – start-ups are risky.

What’s the role of accelerators and incubators today and going forward?

There are over 300 accelerator and incubator programs in London. And they are dying. There are so many programs that it becomes harder and harder to fill a cohort with quality start-ups. My feeling is that we will see the accelerator and incubator programs of today fade away. There is another related trend that hints towards the future: Large corporates are shutting down their innovation programs. After 3 years of heavy investment in innovation teams and programs and agencies with little or no returns, big companies are shutting these programs down. The new-new thing is in-house incubators. More and more large corporates are engaging with startups in their sector looking for companies who will ultimately disrupt them. If a large corporate can spot an opportunity early enough they can either buy the start-up or they can change their organization to survive the disruption. Also, by putting individual team members of corporates alongside start-ups there exists an opportunity for cultural change on the company side and invaluable mentoring on the side of the startup. The future of incubators and accelerators is that they become programs within large corporates – and free standing accelerators go away.

What is the best team composition for a startup?

The minimum team for a startup is two co-founders: One commercial and one product/service. In the very early days, it is best to outsource as much of the development and design as you can (beyond what the 2 person team can do themselves). If you hire developers, designers and more too early there will come a time when they have nothing to do. The dev team stops while the marketing team engages and then the marketing team stops while the dev team catches up. It’s only when the product market fit has been validated and the cycle of build-test-learn becomes continuous that you should hire full-time extended teams. One other specific role that should be on your team is a “sector specialist”. If your main USP is the use of big data or AI/ML or genetic manipulation – then you really need to have a dedicated individual on the team to back up your ability to deliver.

What’s the number one problem startups have with their pitch decks?

There are so many problems that I see with pitch decks. The number one problem is that the startup doesn’t use a “Language of value” – Too often they talk about features and user experiences and they fail to successfully communicate the value their business brings to the market and how they extract value from users and customers. BTW – the 2nd biggest problem is that startups try to use the same pitch when speaking to customers and when speaking to investors.

What’s the most exciting startup that you’ve seen recently – and why?

Great question. Sceenic (http://sceenic.co/) is the most exciting startup that I’ve seen lately. The thing that makes me excited is that they are solving a real problem for broadcast television – they are capitalizing on social – they are engaging using video – and they are partnering in a way that gives them access to a large audience. Did I mention they have bootstrapped themselves to get to this point and have a pilot with a major UK broadcaster? The founder is a seasoned startup guy (with one startup under his belt) and knows how to make the company work. He has all the makings for a really good growing business and future exit.

Which market sectors are over-represented by start-ups?

In the UK it’s all about AdTech and FinTech – But I wouldn’t say that they are over-represented. The sectors that are over-represented are FoodDeliveryTech, EdTech and HR Tech. We just don’t need another food delivery platform. And EdTech and HRTech are interesting markets with real problems – and little or no budget. They are unlikely to be able to build US$100M businesses.

How is fundraising in EU different from raising funds in the US?

There are a couple of key ways: 1) The US investment community is all centrally located. This results in a lot of start-ups congregating where the money is. And the money then competes for the start-ups. It’s a vicious cycle that drives up valuations and interest. 2) US Companies are happier to invest in companies who can build an audience and focus on monetization later. EU investors want to see cash flow positive in 18 months and break-even in 36 months. This means that you have to focus on revenue from day 1. 3) In the EU a failed startup in your past is a kiss-of-death. In the US it (can be) a badge of honor. It’s all about a cultural difference between EU and US. The US rewards the one who tries – even if they fail. The EU rewards the few who succeed in spite of everything.

How can corporates best support the European Startup Ecosystem?

Corporates can support the ecosystem through their own accelerator programs (as mentioned above) but they can also do a lot to support European Startups by providing open access to the company and to the teams within the company. Corporates who have quarterly events where any startup can come along and pitch to the various departments and get access to decision makers not to sell – but to get real feedback from decision makers – is hugely valuable. The corporate benefits in that they get a far better understanding of what’s going on in the market at the startup level. And startups get first-hand feedback in a non-selling environment. It’s a few hours every quarter and a small lobby full of 10-20 startups. Huge value.


Principal and Founder – Troy Norcross

This is my strategy consulting firm. I have worked in large corporations and 2 of my own startups. I have a technical background in software development and business background including operations, marketing, and sales. I have been CEO of companies and managed shareholders and I have been the chief cook and bottle washer in teams of 3. The diversity of my experiences is what makes me unique. My ability to listen and ask probing questions is what makes me effective.

Check out his LinkedIn profile HERE for more info.

Startup Business Review

How Important is a Pitch Deck?

A few years ago, I joined Toastmasters. I joined because I honestly believe that 1) Public Speaking is one of the most compelling marketing tools in a entrepreneur’s bag of tricks and 2) Almost all of our public speaking could use a little work and outside guidance.  Don’t believe me? Set up you cam to capture your most profound thoughts and after 5 minutes play it back. I hate to say “I told you,” – oh, who am I kidding? – See, I  told you!

Your pitch is your one big chance to get that ever elusive “angel” to become interested in you next Uber like business that’s a guaranteed Unicorn. Are you really going to go it alone?

I was commiserating with a long time friend of mine, Troy Norcross, about sitting through yet another batch of bad pitches.  “You know we can help those startups? They should talk to us.” Yup, he’s got a startup and it specifically helps perfect your pitch – Startup Business Review. He also work with you to get in front of the right investors.

How important is a pitch deck?

It’s a great question – and a terrible question all at once. I think that one of the biggest issues that people face when pitching is that there isn’t just a single pitch deck that they need. There’s the pitch deck that you send when you can’t present the business yourself, the 20 minute stand up pitch deck, the 5 minute pitch deck, the pitch deck you use to pitch your business and the pitch deck you use to pitch your product.

How important is your pitch deck? How important is it for you to convince people to think and act differently?

What should you lead with?

Empathy and Curiosity. In the first slide you have to communicate to your audience that you have a shared view of the world – and that you might have something new to share with them.

Some pitch decks lead with explaining the problem. Some lead with describing the size of the opportunity. Some lead with their amazing team. The most important thing is that you lead with a message that your audience is going to immediately relate to and then want to learn more about.

What are the key messages that you need to convey?

This all depends on who you are pitching – but if we’re assuming that you’re pitch deck is for investors the most important message you can convey is that you are “investable”. The pitch deck needs to leave business angel the feeling that you genuinely understand your market, your customers pain, your solution and your teams ability to deliver.

Can you explain what “Go to Market” entails?

“Go To Market” – In earlier times Go To Market meant putting your products (eggs, spices, garments, etc.) into a cart and walking to the market. The market was where all the people would come and walk in and out and through the stalls looking at everyone’s goods. You would arrange your products to look as attractive as possible in the hopes of selling as much as you could.

Go To Market in the digital world is much the same, but instead of taking your cart to a centralized market, you have to come up with a strategy that allows you to reach those people who might want to buy your product or service and to get them to come to your website (your stall) and then make sure that your product presents in as attractive way as possible.

Put more simply – a go to market strategy describes how you are going to make sure that as many potential customers as possible come to you.

Another nuance of a good Go To Market strategy is that you want the “right” customers – not just “lots” of customers. You want to reach people who are looking for a solution to a problem that you solve – and who have the money and ability to pay for it.

What about the Revenue Hockey Stick?

Ah – the hockey stick. It’s that part of the graph that shows you growing from meager numbers of customers and revenue – and suddenly shooting to the stratosphere. The hockey stick has become a bad cliché. Most investors just let out a “sigh” when they see a hockey stick forecast.

If you’re going to put a hockey stick in your pitch deck, be ready. investors will grill you on all the assumptions that you have made to create the rapid growth.

Some US-based investors don’t even want to see the hockey stick – they know you have one in the deck. Some UK investors actually rate you as being “naïve” if you have a hockey stick – unless you can back it up.

The best time to put a hockey stick in your deck is when you’ve had the initial traction and you can show real data that you’ve crossed the bend in the hockey stick – when the graph looks more like a boomerang – with the potential  to become a hockey stick – now that’s interesting.

What should you avoid?

Here’s a list of things that I think everyone should avoid:

  • Never create a deck without answering each of these questions:
    • Who is my audience
    • How much time do I have to present / does my audience have to read?
    • After seeing my deck, what do I want my audience to think?
    • After seeing my deck, what do I want my audience to do?
    • At the end of the deck is there a clear, simple and reasonable call to action? (Call me for more info. Invest £500K for 20% today. etc.)
  • Too much text – and text that is so small you can’t read it. If you’re presenting the deck use the Guy Kawasaki idea of no font smaller than 30 point. If you’re not going to present – but only mailing the deck – no font smaller than 20 point.
  • Too many slides: Really you should aim for 10 – 20 slides. You can have a further 10 slides in the back of the deck to answer specific questions – but remember,  the first 10-15 slides need are a stand alone complete presentation.

What do investors really look at?

Pitching is selling – and your vision and your ability to lead a team to deliver that vision is what investors are looking at. You could have the best idea and team in the world – and if the investor doesn’t connect with you – it’s not going to happen.

Do I need an exit strategy?

The Exit Strategy is another one of those “almost a cliché” things. Most business plans say: “And then we’ll be bought out by Google, Facebook,Amazon or someone else.” – What an investor wants to know is not what is “your” exit strategy – but what is “their” exit strategy. When will the business be at a point where they can take their money back and what returns are you hoping to offer? Are you going to go public? Are you going for acquisition? Of is this a business that you want to run for the rest of your life? ( A lifestyle business )

How can you help?

Your pitch is a critical part of the success of your business. I can help you look not just at the pictures and text on your slides – but with the pitch itself. I do this by asking you questions and helping you to see your pitch from the viewpoint of the audience.

Right now, I’m offering a review of your pitch deck against 25 key points. After reviewing the deck, I’ll spend 30 minutes with you 1 on 1 sharing my ideas on where you’ve nailed it – and where you can improve.

After you’ve had a personal pitch review with me – you’ll look at your business differently, your audience differently – and your pitch differently.

Register at www.startupbusinessreview.co.uk for your pitch review today.

Startup Stories – Anthony Barba FreewayWorks

Telling Stories

Every startup (every business for that matter) has an untold story.  Not the sanitized, after the fact summation of our success types – but real stories about getting from Point A to B via points 1,2 12, 37, 42 and 61.  Brainstorms, meltdowns, pivots, dating, breaking up, funding, compromise. In the end, either against all odds success or going down in a spectacular ball of flame.  Failures? Hardly,  Life’s lessons? Absolutely. Why do the rare few succeed?  What really happened?  It may not be pretty, but it will be real.

There is more to telling stories than simply regurgitating facts.  It’s about curating, learning and ultimately editing – editing not in the sense to make the players good but to get to the heart of what was truly going on. What was the context? What were you feeling? What was your agenda? Why was George Michael playing in the background? (We’ll get back to that one)

What’s the point? Somewhere between scrubbed case studies and reality TV is a level of transparency that is entertaining and offer actionable insights on building a startup, raising more and growing a business.  And so we begin….

And to begin, we have to go back. Back to the beginning, back to where it started.

Anthony (Anthony Barba of FreewayWorks and the Mobility Report) and I met at Startupbootcamp’s Selection Days in Berlin in the spring of 2015.  Anthony and his team (Dennis and David) were finalists trying to secure a space in the Mobility Accelerator.  I was one of many mentors meeting 20 teams to narrow the selection to 10 participants for the programs.  I think we may have spent 30 minutes together.  They pitched and we (the mentors) questioned.

The company was HeyRide and Anthony and his team successfully secured a spot in the next program.  Over the next few months, we casually stayed in touch via Linkedin and the occasional email.  They were busy in the Accelerator and I had moved on to clients and other stuff.  I didn’t run into Anthony again until Demo Days at the end of the program…

Startup Stories - Anthony Barba FreewayWorks

Although very different, Anthony and I shared some common elements.  We had both grown up on the south shore of Long Island.  We had both somehow landed in Berlin.  We were both involved in the Silicon Allee/Startupbootcamp world and we were both trying to figure out our next move.

And so begins another startup journey….

Oh, and as for George Michael? Well, that’s another story for another time.

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